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Soundcraft 



200B 



USER MANUAL 



Soundcraft Electronics Ltd. 
Cranbome House 
Cranbome Industrial Estate 
Cranbome Road 
Potters Bar 
Hertfordshire EN6 3JN 
England 

Tel: 0707 665000 
Fax: 0707 660483 
Telex: 21198 



Soundcraft Canada Inc 
Hymus Boulevard 
Dorval 

Quebec. Canada. H9P 1J6. 
Tel: (514) 685 1610 

Telex: 05 822582 

Facsimile: (514) 685 2094 



JBL 

PO Box 2200 
8500 Balboa Boulevard 
Northr idge 
CA 91329 

Tel: 818 893 4351 
Telex: 23 66 4923 

Facsimile: 818 893 3639 

Soundcraft Japan 
4F Yoyogi Living, 

12-21 Sendagaya 5, 

Shibuyaku, Tokyo, 151 Japan. 
Tel: (03) 341 6201. 
Facsimile: (03) 341 5260 



The information in this document has been carefully checked and is believed 
to be entirely reliable. However, no responsibility is assumed for 
inaccuracies. Furthermore, Soundcraft reserves the right l,o make changes to 
any products herein to improvs reliability, functian or design. 

Soundcraft does not assume any liability arising out of the apfilication or 
use of any product or circuit described herein. 




SOUNDCRAFT SERIES 200B MIXING CONSOLE 



CONTENTS 


PAGE I 


1 .00 


CONSOLE SPECIFICATION 


2 


2.00 


GENERAL DESCRIPTION 


3 


2.01 


Input Module 


4 


2.02 


Master Module 


7 


2.03 


Optional Stereo Input Module 


1 2 


3.00 


CONNECTIONS AND WIRING 


1 5 


3.01 


Input Connection Panel 


1 5 


3.02 


Output Connection Panel 


1 6 


3.03 


Stereo Input Rear Connection Panel 


18 


3.04 


General Wiring 


1 9 


3.05 


Interface levels 


21 


3.06 


Fuse Ratings 


22 


4.00 


8 -TRACK OPERATION 


23 


4.01 


P.A. APPLICATIONS 


27 


4.02 


OPERATION OF STEREO INPUT 


28 


5.00 


MAINTENANCE 


29 


5.01 


General Fault Finding 


29 


5.02 


Removing Modules 


30 


5.03 


Meter Alignment 


31 


5.04 


Lamp Replacement 


31 


5.05 


Power Supply Servicing 


32 


6.00 


GLOSSARY OF TERMS USED 


33 


7.00 


TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION 


35 


7.01 


General description 


35 


7.02 


Input Channels 


36 


7.03 


Group Outputs 


36 


7.04 


Master LH PCB (Auxiliary Masters) 


37 


7.05 


Master RH PCB 


37 


8.00 


WARRANTY 


39 


9.00 


CUSTOMER SPARES KIT LIST 


41 


10.00 


SCHEMATICS 


42 



*No t e 

CPS ^50 or 650 Power Supplies have 
USER MANUAL. 



seperate 



Pagel 



1 .00 



SERIES 200B 



Model No Frame size 

Serial No PSU Serial No 

(as used in final test) 

Original Customer Works Order No 

PROGRESS NAME DATE SUPERVISORS 

INSPECTION 

Frame Fitted by 

Assembled/wired by 

First Test by 

Final Test by 

Despatch Inspection by 

EQUIPPED WITH TYPE QUANTITY ISSUE 

Input Modules 

Output Modules 

Master Module 

P.S.U 

OPTIONS - SPECIFY 

ALTERATIONS TO SPEC. 

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS 

DESPATCH KIT REQUIRED 



Page2 



2.00 SOUNDCRAFT SERIES 200B CONSOLE 



GENERAL DESCRIPTION 

The Soundcraft Series 200B is designed primarily for up to 
8-track recording, as well as public address and monitor 
applications . 

The console has 4 main buses, 4 auxiliary outputs and dedicated 
mix outputs. All inputs are electronically balanced. 

Electronic balancing reduces the degradation of signal quality 
which is introduced by more conventional transformer coupled 
designs, ensuring superior transient response, minimal phase 
shift and excellent common mode rejection even at high 
frequencies . 

The outputs, with the exception of the Mix Outputs and the 
Control Room Outputs, are "GROUND COMPENSATED" to minimise hum 
or interference in differing enviroments, where earthing rules, 
etc may not always have been adhered to. 

The Microphone Input impedance is greater than 2kOhms, which 
will not cause any loading effects on any normally used 
microphone. The Line level Input has an input impedance of 
greater than lOkOhms, which is high enough to ensure that it 
will interface with most studio peripheral equipment without 
causing loading effects. 

The auxiliary sends are selectable between both Pre/Post EQ and 
Pre/Post Fade by the use of push-on links (Jumpers) on the PCB. 

Metering is via 4 VUs reading Group Outputs 1-4. Meters 3 and 4 
are switchable as a pair to read the monitor source. This may 
be either the stereo mix bus, the 2-track return or any PFL/AFL 
signal . 

The power supply is an external unit supplying the console with 
1 7volts positive and negative rails and +48V Phantom Power 
supply . 

The console is designed to work at either +4dBu or -lOdBV 
(Tascam) level. Changing between the two requires altering an 
internal switch on the group outputs and adding push-on jumpers 
on the input channel PCBs. 

The console is available with 8, 16, or 24 input modules. There 
is also an optional rack mounting version with a maximum of 8 
input modules. A stereo Line input module will also be 
available for use with stereo effects devices, keyboards etc. 

In a broadcast situation this module is available to introduce 
stereo cart machines, turntables etc into the console. 



Pages 



2.01 INPUT MODULE 



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1 . Channel Input Section 



The Channel can be operated in either Mic or 
Line Input modes. Both the Mic Input and the 
Line Input are electronically balanced for 
optimum low noise performance. 

Mic Input impedance is greater than 2kOhms and 
Line Input impedance is greater than lOkOhms. 

a) PAD 

Pressing the PAD button inserts a 20dB 
attenuator into the Mic path. 

b) LINE 

The high level Line Input is selected by 
pressing the LINE button. Tape returns 
should be re-patched into the Line Input 
socket for remix purposes. 

c) INPUT GAIN 

The Input Gain is used to ensure that the 
source, whether Mic or Line sufficiently 
"drives" the module. If the source signal 
is too high, causing distortion, the level 
may be attenuated to match the working 
level of the module. If the source signal 
is too low, it may be boosted to reach the 
working level of the module. 

To achieve the optimum working level for 
the module, and for the console, first set 
the fader(s) and the relevant group fader 
to unity gain, and then adjust the input 
gain(s) so that you are sending sufficient 
level to tape for optimum signal to noise, 
without introducing distortion. 

2. Equaliser Section 

The Equaliser on each module is a 4-band, 
fixed frequency design. All amplitude pots 
are centre detented for easy zeroing. 

a) HF 

Provides 1 5dB of boost or cut at 12kHz. 

The control has a "shelving" 
characteristic, ie. The slope of the EQ 
curve does not keep rising with frequency 
but having reached the desired amount, 
flattens out or "shelves" from that 
frequency on. 



Page4 




b) HI MID 

1 5dB of boost or cut is available at 5kHz 
with a "peak/dip" characteristic. ie . 
Having reached maximum amplitude (or 
minimum in the case of cut), the amplitude 
response returns to zero on either side of 
that frequency. The shape of the curve, 
when plotted, gives a characteristic bell 
shape. 

c) LO MID 

1 5dB of boost or cut is available at 250Hz 
with a "peak/dip" characteristic. 

d) LF 

1 5dB of boost or cut is available at 60Hz 
with a "shelving" characteristic. 

3. Auxiliary section 

There are four auxiliary sends available for 
use as echo, foldback or other auxiliary 
effects units. 

For each pair of Auxiliary sends there are 
three options on where to take the auxiliary 
send from, these are:- 

i. Pre-EQ and Pre-Fade. 

ii. Post-EQ and Pre-Fade. 

iii. Post-EQ and Post-Fade. 

These options are selected by a series of 
push-on links (jumpers) as marked on the PCB. 

eg. 



Pre Post Pre Post 
Aux 1&2 



Aux 3&4 

EQ FADER 

Refer to the Input module circuit diagram, 
(ED2183) and the Input module signal flow 
diagram, (ED2227). 



Pages 



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1b 



4. 



Routing Section 



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The channel input can be routed to any or all 
of the 4 Group outputs and the stereo mix by 
selecting the relevant routing button. 

a ) PAN POT 

The pan pot is a centre detented control, 
with a loss of 4 . 5dB at its centre point. 
This is a compromise between the 3dB loss 
required for constant power panning and 
the 6dB loss required for constant voltage 
panning. 

b) ROUTING 

Selection of any of the routing buttons 
assigns the channel input signal to any 
pair of group outputs or the stereo mix 
via the Pan Pot. By panning left the 
signal may be routed to odd numbered 
groups and by panning right the signal may 
be routed to even numbered groups. 

5. Channel status section 

a) ON 

The channel "ON" status is indicated by a 
green LED. 

b) PFL 

Pressing PFL (Pre-fade listen) soloes the 
signal from that module on the 
monitor/headphone outputs, along with any 
other modules that have their PFL button 
down. The PFL signal is taken after the 
insert return but before the ON switch. 

c ) PEAK 

The PEAK LED illuminates when the signal 
level at the insert send point is 4dB 
below clipping. 

d ) CHANNEL FADER 

The Channel fader is a long throw linear 
fader. Infinity cut off is greater than 
90dB. 



t 60 
oo 



Page6 



2.02 MASTER MODULE 




The Master Module contains the VU 
meters, the Group/Returns sections, 
Oscillator, Talkback, the Auxiliary 
masters and the Control Room Monitor 
section 

1 . The VU meters 



The four VU meters usually monitor 
the outputs from the 4 groups, or 
Tape/FX Returns. Pressing the MNTR 
button changes the function of meters 
3 and 4. These may now be used to 
monitor the main mix bus, or the 
auxiliaries, 3 reads left and 4 reads 
right. 

If PFL or AFL has been pressed then 
the meters will monitor the PFL/AFL 
buses which feed the 
monitors/headphones . 

2. Group/Return section 



The Group/Return section handles the 
functions of 2 Tape/FX Returns and a 
Group Output. The monitor section 
may be used to monitor either the 
group output or the corresponding 
return when this is selected by the 
appropriate RET button. Returns 1-4 
are positioned at the bottom and 
Returns 5-8 at the top. 

i. RETURNS 5-8 

These are dedicated Tape/FX 
Return monitors. 

a) VOL 

The Monitor Volume control 
enables the monitor contribution 
to the stereo mix to be adjusted 
in level, allowing a satisfactory 
monitor balance to be achieved 
during record and playback. 

b) AUX 1 

The auxiliary send is post fader 
and may be used to provide 
headphone mixes during recording 
and overdubbing. 



Page? 







PAN 

The PAN control allows the 
monitor signal to be panned to 
the correct position within the 
stereo mix, 

PFL 

The PFL facility on the monitor 
signal is independent of the 
monitor volume. 

SECTIONS 1-4 

These may be used to monitor 
either the associated group 
outputs OR one of the Tape/FX 
Returns 1 -4 . 

RET 

When the RET button is pressed 
the monitor source will be the 
Tape/FX Return. When the Return 
button is up the monitor source 
will be the Group Output. 

VOL 

The Monitor Volume control 
enables the monitor contribution 
to the stereo mix to be adjusted 
in level, allowing a satisfactory 
monitor balance to be achieved 
during record and playback. 

AUX 1 

The auxiliary send is post fader 
and may be used to provide 
headphone mixes during recording 
and overdubbing. 

PAN 

The PAN control allows the 
monitor signal to be panned to 
the correct position within the 
stereo mix. 

SUB 

When the SUB button is pressed 
the group fader below overrides 
the VOL control and accesses the 
mix bus via the pan pot, and 
consequently the main master 
outputs . 



Pages 








The VOL control, although 
bypassed, is not redundant. If 
RET is selected, the VOL controls 
the signal from the appropriate 
return socket and routes it to 
the Group below. This additional 
signal may be regarded as a 
separate input with level control 
and aux send BUT it can only 
access one group. ie. for Return 
1 , Group 1 . 

PEL 

The PFL facility on the monitor 
signal is independent of the 
monitor volume. 

GROUP FADERS 

The 4 long throw, linear faders 
control the overall group output 
levels . 



Page9 







3. Auxiliary Master Section 

Each of the four auxiliary buses has 
its own master level control and an 
AFL select. The AFL works in the 
same way as the PFL bus. eg. AFL 
soloes the signal from that Auxiliary 
master on the monitor, (headphone 
output), along with any other 
Auxiliary masters with AFL selected. 

4. Oscillator 
a) OSC LEVEL 

The oscillator may be adjusted in 
level . 



The ON switch enables the 
® internal 1kHz Oscillator and 
(j routes it to the Group and 
Auxiliary buses. 

5. Talkback 

The Talkback microphone is an 
electret microphone and has variable 
gain controlled by the Talkback Gain 
pot. The Talkback signal overrides 
the Oscillator. 

a) TB TO ALL 

This routes the Talkback signal 
to the Group buses and all four 
Auxiliaries . 

b) TB TO AUX 1-2 

This sends the Talkback signal to 
Auxiliaries 1 and 2. 

6. Monitor Section 
a ) MON VOL 

The Monitor Volume is controlled 
by a variable gain pot. 



This allows the signal from the 
2-track master machine to be 
routed to the monitor 
speakers/headphones . 



Pagel 0 










c) 



d) 



e) 



3 



4a 

4b 



6d 



SOLO LED 

The SOLO LED illuminates whenever 
a PEL has been selected on an 
Input module or Group Output OR 
when an AFL has been selected on 
the Auxiliary masters. 

MASTER FADERS 

The long throw master faders 
control the overall level of the 
stereo mix. 

PHONES 

The headphone socket expects to 
see 600 Ohms. Monitor speakers 
are cut when headphones are 
inserted. The socket is wired as 
follows : - 

Tip: LEFT 

Ring: RIGHT 

Sleeve: GROUND 



6e 



Pagel 1 









OPTIONAL STEREO INPUT MODULE 




The optional stereo input module is available 
in blocks of 2. 

1 . Channel Input Section 

The channel Line Input is electronically 
balanced with an input impedance of greater 
than lOkOhms, which is high enough to 
interface to any normal professional 
peripheral equipment without loading the 
source . 

The interface level can be either +4dBu or 
-lOdBV. To select -lOdBV remove jumpers JT and 
J2on the input PCB. 

a) <fc(Phase) 

Pressing the Phase button will invert the 
phase on the left-hand input only to 
correct for any input mismatch. 

b) INPUT GAIN 

The Input Gain can be varied between -1 OdB 
and +10dB of gain using the Gain Trim 
control . 

c) L & R 

i With both these switches out the 
module works in stereo mode. 

ii With either L or R switched in, both 
channels of the module are fed by 
either the left or right input. 

iii With both switches pressed, both 
channels of the module are fed by a 
mono sum of the left and right input. 

2. Equaliser Section 

The Equaliser is a versatile unit, allowing 3 
areas of control over the audio spectrum. All 
amplitude pots are centre detented for easy 
zeroing . 

a) / (High Pass Filter) 

The High Pass Filter operates at 100Hz 
with an ultimamte slope of 12dB/Octave. 
This will effectively remove low frequency 
stage rumble, and other extraneous 
signals . 



Pagel 2 






b) HF (High Frequency) 

1 5dB of boost or cut is available at 
10kHz, with a "shelving" characteristic, 
ie. the slope of the EQ curve does not 
keep rising with frequency but, having 
reached the desired amount, flattens out 
or "shelves" from that frequency on. 

c) LF (Low Frequency) 

1 5dB of boost or cut is available at 60Hz, 
with a "shelving" characteristic. 

d) EQ 

The Equaliser circuitry can be switched in 
and out of the signal path, independently 
of the high pass filter. 



3. Auxiliary section 



There are four auxiliary sends available for 
use as echo, foldback or other auxiliary 
effects units. 



Each pair of Auxiliaries may be pre selected 
either pre or post fader. These options are 
selected by a series of push-on links 
(jumpers) as marked on the PCB. 



eg. 

Pre Post 
Aux 1&2 



Aux 3&4 

FADER 

Refer to the Stereo Input module circuit 
diagram, (ED2298 ) and the Stereo Input module 
signal flow diagram, (ED2259 ) . 



60 

00 



Pagel 3 




4. Routing Section 




The channel input signal may be routed to any 
pair of Group Ouputs, (1-2, 3-4) and/or the 
Stereo Mix, by selecting the relevant routing 
button. 

a ) BALANCE 

The balance control corrects or 
deliberately creates any changes in stereo 
imaging before the fader and the auxiliary 
sends- The balance control has a range of 
+ 5dB. 

b) ROUTING 

Selection of any routing button assigns 
the channel signal to a pair of output 
groups, or the stereo mix, via the balance 
correction. 

5. Channel Status Section 



a) ON 

The channel "ON" status is indicated by a 
green LED. 

b) PEL 

Pre-Fade Listen soloes the Pre-fader, post 
insert jack signal independently of the 
the ON switch. This gives a mono check of 
the signal, after the insert point but 
before the on/off switch. PFL operation 
is indicated by a red master warning LED 
on the master module. 

c) PEAK 

A red LED indicates the peak signal level. 
This gives a visual indication that the 
higher signal, either Right or Left, 
before the insert points is within 5dB of 
clipping . 

d ) CHANNEL FADER 

The Channel Fader is an accurately matched 
long throw stereo fader. Infinity cut off 
is greater than -90dB. 



Pagel 4 




3.00 CONNECTIONS AND WIRING 



There are two types of standard connector panel on the Series 
200B console. These are the Input connector panel and the main 
output connector panel. There is always one output panel, but 
the input panels each serve 8 input modules. So if you have a 
16 input console you will have two input panels. 

If you have the rack mounting version the input and output 
connection panels are not separate. 

3.01 INPUT CONNECTION PANEL 



The Input panel serves 8 Input modules and the panel is labelled 
accordingly. ie. 1-8, 9-16 etc. 

a) INS 

These stereo standard jacks carry both the insert send and 
the insert return signals. Under normal conditions with 
nothing inserted the signal is normalled through by the jack 
socket and thus inserting a jack will automatically break 
this link. 

The insert point is post EQ but BEFORE the PFL , ON switch 
and fader. 

Tip: Insert return (Unbalanced) 

Ring: Insert send (Unbalanced) 

Sleeve: COMMON GROUND 

b) LINE 

These stereo standard jacks carry the balanced Line Input, 
and are wired as follows :- 

Tip: HOT (In phase signal) 

Ring: COLD (Out of phase signal) 

Sleeve: GROUND 

c ) MIC 

These carry the balanced microphone inputs and are wired as 
follows : - 

Pin 1 : GROUND 

Pin 2: HOT (In phase signal) 

Pin 3: COLD (Out of phase signal) 

d) PWR 

The PWR switch provides phantom power of +48volts for 
capacitor microphones. 

NB: It is not advisable to use an unbalanced microphone, or 
DI boxes with the Phantom power on. 



Pagel 5 



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SOUNDCRAFT ELECTRONICS LTD 


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LONDON EC1V OBX. 




TELEPHONE. 01261-3631/2/3 


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TELEGRAMS. S0UNCX:RAFT LDN ECI 




TELEX.uk. No. 21198. USA. No. 224408 



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3.02 OUTPUT CONNECTION PANEL 



a) GROUP OUTPUTS 1-4 

These carry the signal from the Group Outputs and are Ground 
Compensated, they are wired as follows 

Pin 1 : GROUND 

Pin 2: HOT 

Pin 3: COLD 

As the console only has the 4 outputs to feed all 8 tracks 
of the tape machine either 

i. Parallel the connections of the inputs on the 8-track 
of tracks 1-4 and 5-8, using the tape machines logic 
to ensure that you record on the correct tracks, 

OR 

ii. Use a box which changes over the feeds either 
individually or all together, 

OR 

iii. Simply manually plug the correct outputs from the 
console into the inputs of the 8-track on an 
individual basis as the session progresses, 

b) TAPE RETURNS 

These stereo standard jack sockets carry the Tape Returns 
and are wired as follows; - 

Tip: HOT (In phase signal) 

Ring: COLD (Out of phase signal) 

Sleeve: GROUND 

During mix down, you would normally connect the outputs of 
the 8-track to the Line Inputs on modules 1 -8 to make use of 
the input module's more extensive facilities, thus freeing 
the RETs inputs for effects returns etc. 

It is perfectly feasible to parallel the outputs of the 
8-track and to permanently connect one set to the RETs 
sockets and the other to the line input sockets on modules 
1-8. This is assuming that you have more than 8 inputs, so 
that during mix down, you may bring effects returns etc. 
down individual input modules. 

If you have an 8-track which has dedicated sync outputs, 
such as the SOUNDCRAFT 381 , you would normally connect the 
sync outputs to RETs 1-8 and the playback outputs to line 
inputs 1 -8 . 



Pagel 6 



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SOUNDCRAFT ELECTRONICS LTD 
S-8 GREAT SUTTON STREET 
LONDON EC1V0BX. 

TELEPHONE. 01-251-3631^/3 
TELEGRAMS. SOUNDCRAFT LDN EC1 
TELEX. UK. No. 211M. USA. No. 224408 



TITLE S200B 

STD 0/p REAR CONN 

PANEL 



DRo, No. MI 2420 



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MIX INSERTS 



c ) 

This stereo standard jack socket allows the Mix bus to be 
accessed immediately before the Master Faders, and is wired 
as follows:- 

Tip: Insert return (Unbalanced) 

Ring: Insert send (Unbalanced) 

Sleeve: COMMON GROUND 

d) 2 -TRACK RETURNS 

These stereo standard jacks carry 2-track returns and are 
wired as follows:- 

Tip: HOT (In phase signal) 

Ring: COLD (Out of phase signal) 

Sleeve: GROUND 

e) AUX OUTPUTS 

These are stereo standard jack sockets for the Auxiliary 
masters and are ground compensated. (MI2426). 

Tip: HOT 

Ring: COLD 

sleeve: GROUND 

f) MIX OUTPUTS 

These sockets carry the main stereo outputs and are 
balanced. They are wired as follows :- 

Pin 1 : GROUND 

Pin 2: HOT (In phase signal) 

Pin 3: COLD (Out of phase signal) 

If your master machine is unbalanced, connect the cold pin 
(3) to ground at the input to your machine, and a standard 
1/4" jack from the outputs of the tape machine will suffice. 

g ) CONTROL ROOM 

These unbalanced jack sockets carry the signal to the 
monitor speakers. This signal path is interrupted when 
headphones are plugged in to the headphone socket. They are 
wired as follows:- 

Tip: HOT (In phase signal) 

Ring: Signal Common 

Sleeve: Signal Common 



Pagel 7 



3.03 OPTIONAL STEREO INPUT REAR CONNECTOR PANEL 

Each connector panel for the stereo input modules contains 2 
channels, thus, the stereo input modules can only be fitted in 
blocks of 2. (Either 2 modules or 1 module and 1 blank.) 

a) L & R LINE INPUTS 

The XLR sockets carry the balanced line inputs for the left 
and right inputs as marked. They are wired as follows: 

Pin 1 : GROUND 

Pin 2: HOT (In phase signal) 

Pin 3: COLD (Out of phase signal) 

b) L & R INSERTS 

These stereo standard jacks carry both the insert sends and 
returns for the left and right channels as marked and are 
wired as follows 
Tip: Return (Unbalanced) 

Ring: Send (Unbalanced) 

Sleeve: Common Ground 



Page! 8 




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UOO 30910 


































3.04 GENERAL WIRING PROCEDURE 



To take full advantage of your Soundcraft Console, with its 
excellent signal to noise ratio and low distortion figures, care 
must be taken that the enviroment into which you place your 
console does not degrade its performance. 

Typical problems are hum, buzz, instability and radio 
interference, these are usually problems which are NOT of the 
console's making. When finally traced, they often turn out to 
be earth loops or an inferior earthing system. Indeed, in some 
areas the mains supply earth is inadequate and separate 
arrangements for earthing must be made. 

A separate technical earth should be installed in these 
instances, and you should ALWAYS check with your electricity 
supply company to ensure that you do not infringe any 
regulations . 

The installation of a successful earthing system requires 
careful planning and adherance to the "rules". Outlined below 
are the main points which should assist you in establishing a 
good audio earthing system. 

Central Earth 



To provide optimum performance, there should only be ONE earth 
point, (star point), for the entire audio installation. Each 
piece of equipment should run a separate lead to this point for 
its earth. It is not good enough to "daisy chain" - joining 
several earths together on their way to the earth point is NOT 
correct . 

Separate Supplies 

A separate mains feed should be used for the audio installation, 
and ONLY for the audio installation. A separate feed should be 
taken from the distribution box and use another feed for any 
other mains outlets such as lighting, kettles etc. 

It may be necessary to install an isolating transformer for the 
audio supply, so that there is positively no interferance from 
the other mains feed. The transformer should be provided with a 
Faraday shield which should be connected to earth. 

Location of Equipment 

NEVER place audio equipment near the mains distribution box. 
Especially tape recorders, as these are particularly sensitive 
to electro-magnetic radiation. 



Pagel 9 



Racks 



A rack full of balanced professional equipment may be earthed as 
a rack, with the rack being connected to the star point by a 
separate lead. ANY equipment which has either unbalanced inputs 
OR outputs should be isolated from the rack and earthed 
separately to the star point. (Otherwise you will get an earth 
loop. ) 

Audio Connection 



Having established the "star" system, then start connecting the 
various audio lines, listening for hum etc. as you go. If you 
do it this way, you should be able to isolate a problem quickly. 
It is probably best to use a logical sequence such as: 
multitrack, stereo tape machines, monitors, echo sends one by 
one, effects units and finally microphone lines. 

Audio Shields 



The screen should generally only be connected at ONE end of the 
cable and this is usually at the signal end. However, there are 
a few exceptions and below is a table covering all the 
interconnection possibilities. If radio frequency seems to be a 
major problem, it is probably best to connect the screen via a 
0.01 micro-farad capacitor. 

Combinations of unbalanced, balanced and electronically 
balanced, (differential), systems mean that there are nine 
interconnection permutations. The optimum of the screen in each 
case is shown in Table 't . 

TABLE 1 



■ 


OUTPUT 


— 

INPUT 


SCREEN 


1 


Unbalanced 


Unbalanced 


Source 


2 


Unba lanced 


Balanced 


Source 


3 


Unbalanced 


Differential 


Source 


4 


Balanced (Note 1) 


Unbalanced 


Destination 


5 


Balanced 


Balanced 


Source 


6 


Balanced (Note 2) 


Differential 


Destination 


7 


Differential (Note 3) 


Unbalanced 


Source 


8 


Differential 


Balanced 


Source 


9 


Differential 


Differential 


Source 



Note 1 - The shield is connected to the destination earth point, 
which is opposite to normal practice, because the 
signal wires being shielded are referenced to the input 
earth, not the output earth. 



Page20 









Note 2 - If the output transformer is centre tapped to earth, 
the screen should be connected at the source. 

Note 3 - When an active differential output is operated in 

unbalanced mode, it is very important that the output 
current returns to earth via the shortest, least 
reactive route. Check for instability at the output. 

N.B. 

a) In all cases, use good quality twin screened audio 
cable. Check for instability at the output. 

b) Always connect both conductors at both ends, and ensure 
that the screen is only connected at one end. 

c) Do not disconnect the mains earth from each piece of 
equipment. This is needed to provide both safety and 
screen returns to the system star point. 

d) Equipment which has balanced inputs and outputs may need 
to be electrically isolated from the equipment rack 
and/or other equipment, to avoid earth loops. 

Ground Compensated Outputs 

The main outputs of the Series 200B are Ground Compensated, as 
already mentioned. V7hen connecting a ground compensated output 
to an unbalanced destination, make sure that the cold lead is 
connected to earth at the DESTINATION end. The consideration 
for wiring the screen at only one end is not of such importance 
with a ground compensated output. (See MI2426) 

3.05 INTERFACE LEVELS 

The Series 200B is normally supplied to be compatible with 
standard professional equipment ie . ■i-'ldBu (ref. 0.775 volt). 

However, provision has been made to allow the user to operate 
with semi-professional tape machines etc. which operate at 
-lOdBV (ref. 1 .Ovolt) . 

The change in tape interface operating level is accomplished by 
reducing the console group output level and increasing the 
console monitor return gain by an equal amount. 

This is easily achieved by pushing a switch, S5, located on the 
Output Module PCB. (Switch OUT for +4dBu, switch IN for 
-lOdBV) . 

MIX OUTPUTS left and right may also interface to -lOdBV by 
removing jumpers 31 and 32 . -lOdBV operation is also 
available on 2-track returns left and right, for 2-track return 
left REMOVE J3 and and 2-track return right REMOVE J5 and J6. 
(See ED2251 Master Right-hand circuit diagram.) 



Page 2 1 



To allow the Line Input to interface to -lOdBV simply remove a 
link on the Input Module PCB. (See ED2183 - on the circuit 
diagram this is located just below the LINE switch). This link 
is located above Conn 1 and immediately left of RIC 1 on the 
input PCB. 

POWER AMPLIFIERS are often rated at 300mV sensitivity for full 
output. In such cases, an attenuator should be installed at the 
input to the power amplifier to attenuate the +4dB level (1.228 
volt) coming from the console, by approximately 10-15dB. 

This may be achieved by using a 2.2kOhm series resistor and 
680 Ohm shunt resistor across the amplifier's input. 

3.06 FUSE RATINGS 

220-240 volts AC the fuse should be 3.15 amps 20mm anti-surge. 

100-120 volts AC the fuse should be 6.3 amps 20mm anti-surge. 

BEFORE SWITCHING ON ALWAYS CHECK THAT THE VOLTAGE SELECTOR IS 
SET CORRECTLY AND THAT THE FUSE IS CORRECT. 



Page22 



4.00 8-TRACK OPERATION 



The Series 200B is particularly suited to 8-track recording, 
since it has a full 8-track monitoring section, 4 auxiliary 
sends and a lot of flexibility. 

The following section contains some suggestions for methods of 
operation. When reading this section you may wish to refer to 
the signal flow diagrams ED2224 and ED2227. 

1 . Monitoring 



The Series 200B is designed for both Loudspeaker monitoring and 
Headphone monitoring. 

To monitor over loudspeakers simply connect the Control Room 
outputs (located on the output connection panel), to the inputs 
of your amplifier. It may be necessary to turn the monitor 
volume pot right down to avoid overloading the input to your 
amplifier, and it some cases it may be necessary to connect a 
stereo attenuator in between the two systems. Be sure to take 
care with earthing. 

Try, wherever possible, to have only one earth point for your 
entire system, and NOT to have all your pieces of equipment 
earthed in separate places, which is almost guaranteed to give 
you mains hum: either 50 or 60Hz depending on where you live. 

( See wiring . ) 

2. Recording - the first tracks 

When laying the first tracks, you will normally have microphones 
plugged into the Input modules and then in turn you will want to 
route these to the 8-track machine. The routing switches may be 
used to send up to 4 tracks at one time. This is usually 
enough, but it is possible to record on more than 4 tracks at 
one time if required. For instance, you may only need to record 
4 tracks, but would like to put the guide vocal on tape for 
reference . 

To send more than 4 signals or groups of signals to the 8-track, 
you have 2 options: you may either use the auxiliary buses, if 

you are not currently using them for echo etc, OR you may take 
the signals direct from the insert points. 

Using the auxiliary buses is a good option, since the auxiliary 
system is a very similar one to the groups. The circuitry is 
the same and there is an overall level control for each 
auxiliary bus, so that you could easily sum several signals and 
then have overall level control to tape. Effects and echo etc. 
are best added via the insert points if they are required, thus 
keeping the auxiliary sends free for recording any groups. 



Page2 3 



Using the insert points is not such an easy option, but probably 
a good one if you only need to send one signal and all the 
auxiliaries are being used. The insert send from the input 
module comes before the module fader, and so level control to 
tape will have to be done at the input to the multitrack. Note 
that the send on the insert socket is the ring of the stereo 
j ack . 

To monitor your sends to tape you normally use the level 
controls 1-4 on the monitor panel, making sure that the RET and 
SUB buttons are NOT pressed. This will allow you to listen to 
the 4 group sends from the console. The levels to tape are set 
via the 4 group faders, the rotary controls 1-4 do not affect 
the level to tape, only the level to the monitors/headphones. 

It is probably best to send to the first 4 tracks recorded to 
tracks 5-8 (1-4 and 5-8 are usually paralleled - the switching 
done on the multitrack remote), so that monitoring becomes 
clearer during overdub. 

If you are recording more than 4 tracks in one go or do not send 
to tracks 5-8 first you will have to control your monitoring 
statuses from the multitrack remote - see below. 

3. Qverdubbing 

When you have recorded the first 4 (or less) tracks, you will 
need to listen to them back. To do this you just use the rotary 
controls 5-8, if you have recorded your first tracks on 5-8. 

Then when you add the next 4 tracks, these correspond to group 
faders 1-4. 

When you send out groups 1-4 (either together or individually) 
you monitor via rotary controls 1-4, and when you need to listen 
back to a particular track press the respective RET button. 



Page24 



4. Using the Multitrack controls 

If your session involves complications such as repeated overdub, 
track-bouncing, or recording more than 4 tracks at once, then it 
is probably best to use the multitracks own controls to 
determine your monitor status. 

Press the 4 RET buttons and from then on the 8 rotary controls 
form a mix of all 8 outputs from the machine at any one time. 
When laying a track or tracks, switch the relevant channel (s) to 
INPUT for laying them and switch them to OUTPUT for listening or 
overdubbing. (Remember to make sure you are in Sync during all 
track laying ) . 

5. Progressing towards Mix 

As your session progresses, the number of tracks being sent to 
at any time usually becomes no more than two, and the number of 
input channels being used also reduces. Assuming that you have 
enough input modules which are unused, you can start preparing 
for your mix as you overdub. You may not necessarily mix 
straight away, but it is often useful to monitor via the Input 
modules so that EQ may be used and more than one auxiliary send 
accessed . 

Plug the outputs from the 8-track into 8 input modules, (1-8 if 
possible for simplicity - they may already be plugged in 
permanently - see connectors and wiring), and turn down all the 
rotary controls 1-8. 

The most straightforward method of obtaining a Mix is to simply 
select MIX on the routing matrix of the input channels, this 
routes the signal directly to the main Mix bus. However, should 
the operator not want to use the mix bus there is another, more 
complex, method of obtaining a stereo mix. 

Reserve one of the pairs of groups for sending to the 
multitrack, and then route all the other input modules to the 
other pair. Say, for example, that 3-4 will be used to send to 
the multitrack, and 1-2 will now form the monitor mix. 

Press SUB above faders 1 and 2, set them to unity gain OdB, and 
pan 1 hard left and 2 hard right. This pair of faders is now 
feeding the stereo mix bus and, consequently, the 
monitor/headphone output. 

Now your monitoring can be done via the 8 input modules 
corresponding to the 8 tracks and the Input/Output status is 
controlled at the machine. When overdubbing is complete, you 
are already set up for Remix. 



Page25 



6 . Mixing down 

Connections and switching for mixing down has already been 
described above, and it should be noted that the monitor 
channels 5-8 may be used as effects returns as they directly 
access the stereo mix bus via their pan pots and respective 
level controls- 

It is also possible to use monitor channels 1-4 as effects 
returns. This may be simply achieved by selecting SUB, which 
then routes the signal present in the monitor channels directly 
to the mix bus. Selecting SUB overrides the rotary control but 
this is not redundant. If RET is selected the VOL controls the 
signal from the appropriate tape return socket and routes it to 
the group below. This additional signal may be regarded as a 
separate input with level control and aux send BUT it can only 
access one group. ie. for return 1 , group 1 . If two of these 
channels, say 1 and 2, were used they can only feed left and 
right respectively and, therefore, are ideal as a stereo echo 
return or similar. 

The same rules would apply to rotary controls 3 and 4 if their 
RET and SUB buttons were pressed. 

Note that the master faders control the send to the mixdown 
machine and also feed the monitors/headphones. 

The monitor/headphone outputs then have a separate level control 
and amplifier, but you will not hear anything unless the master 
faders are up or the 2T button is pressed. 2T feeds the outputs 
from your mixdown machine directly to the monitor/headphone 
output . 



Page26 



4.01 P.A. APPLICATIONS 



The Soundcraft Series 200B is also suitable for live sound work, 
either ; 

a) providing stage foldback for musicians 
OR 

b) as the front of house desk in a small set up. 

To use the Series 200B as a monitor console all instruments are 
connected to the console via microphones or D/I boxes, in the 
usual way. Each output would then be assigned to one or more 
monitor loudspeaker on the stage. 

eg. Mix L and R output might feed the sidefills whilst Groups 
1-4 may be used to feed the individual musicians monitors. 

The Auxiliaries may also be used if more than 6 monitor 
sends are required. 

Should the operator wish to use Effects devices on the 
foldback then Returns 5-8 may be used to feed the main mix 
outputs OR, when RET and SUB are pressed on Returns 1-4 
signal from Tape Returns 1-4 can access the 4 groups and the 
Mix outputs. 

The operator's monitor is provided by the Phones output. 

When used in a small P.A. system the main Mix outputs of the 
Series 200B can provide the sends for the main PA. Effects 
Returns can be routed to the mix bus either by using Returns 5-8 
OR by selecting RET and SUB on Returns 1-4. 

Should the Series 200B be required to provide both the main PA 
sends and foldback sends then the main mix outputs provide the 
front of house PA whilst the Auxiliaries may be used to provide 
the foldback sends, taking the signal for the foldback from the 
Auxiliary outputs. Using the Auxiliaries for foldback sends 
allows the Returns to be used for FX Returns on the main PA. 



Page27 



4.02 OPERATION OF STEREO INPUT 



The Stereo Line input module is similar in operation to the 
standard module except that all paths are in stereo. (NB: Aux 

sends, however, are mono.). This module is particularly useful 
when you wish to introduce stereo keyboards or effects devices 
into the console. In a broadcast situation the stereo input 
modules can be used for cart machines, turntable feeds etc. 

Should the signal entering the module be out of phase pressing 
the Phase button will invert the phase on the left-hand input 
only. The L & R buttons allow a mono source to feed both the 
left and right channels of the module. In the situation where a 
full track recording is replayed on a stereo machine pressing 
both L & R will provide a mono sum of the two inputs. 

The High pass filter and Equaliser can be independently switched 
into the signal path thus enabling the operator to enhance 
sounds before going to tape or 'on air'. 

Four Auxiliary sends, which may be pre-selected in pairs either 
Pre or Post Fade, are available for headphone mixes etc. 
however, it should be noted that the auxiliary sends are mono. 

The signal in the module may be routed to any pair of groups, 
via the balance control, which corrects or deliberately creates 
any errors in stereo imaging. 



Page28 



5.00 MAINTENANCE 



Every console that leaves Soundcraft undergoes a thorough 
testing at all stages of manufacture. These tests include 
individual testing of every function on all the PCB's, a 
thorough testing of all the functions of the completed mixer, a 
soak test of 48 hours before the final test, which consists of 
listening, measuring and mechanical function checks prior to 
packaging and shipment. In this way we try to ensure that any 
faulty components show up long before the console leaves the 
company. Thus a long and trouble-free life can be expected. 

Although all Soundcraft Consoles have been designed with long 
term reliability in mind, it is inevitable that occasional 
maintenance will be required. However, due to the amount of 
attention given to the problems of maintenance during the design 
stages of this console, and the modular construction, servicing 
tends to be extremely simple to carry out, with the minimum of 
test equipment needed to isolate and rectify faults. 

5.01 General Fault Finding 

With the exception of the electronically balanced microphone 
amplifier, and the hybrid discrete/op amp summing amps, all 
signal electronics are configured around high slew rate, low 
noise integrated circuits. The microphone amplifier is a 
proprietory design, utilizing a discrete transistor, noise 
cancelling front end, differentially summed via a low noise 
integrated circuit. 

The use of integrated circuits means that the majority of audio 
faults can be repaired by simply replacing the I.C., having 
first isolated the fault to a particular stage in the signal 
chain. The isolation can often be done without even having to 
remove the module from the console, by judicious use of insert 
points, and/or switching the module to various modes. As with 
all servicing a good knowledge of the basic signal flow is 
necessary for best results. Each module should be viewed as a 
number of signal blocks, through which the signal must flow. If 
the signal appears at the input to a block, but not at the 
output, then the fault lies within that block. By dividing a 
module into individual sections, what at first appears to be an 
extremely complicated piece of equipment can be simplified into 
a series of sequential stages. This is the basic first move in 
all types of fault finding, and usually requires no more than a 
certain amount of logical thought. Servicing a console is more 
a matter of clear thinking and having an understanding of what 
should be happening, than having a highly developed technical 
knowledge . 



Page29 



To illustrate the method of logical fault finding, let us assume 
that we have a non functioning input module, in both microphone 
and line modes. 

The first step is to ensure that a fault really does exist! 

Check that the module is in the correct mode of operation, and 
that no jacks are inserted in the insert points, which may be 
interrupting the signal flow. 

If in doubt about the module operation, set up an adjacent 
module in exactly the same way, which will allow a direct 
comparison between a working and possible non-working module. 

Route the channel directly to MIX, so that the channel may be 
monitored in the normal way. Using an oscillator set it to 
approximately 1kHz and patch the oscillator signal into the 
channel Line Input. If all is well, an undistorted signal 
should now be heard. More likely, because of the fault it 
won ' t . 

Large sections of the module circuitry can be by-passed by 
monitoring the signal at the insert send. 

If bypassing a section causes the signal to re-appear, then the 
fault is located in that section, which can then be traced at 
component level, by removing the module from the console frame, 
and reconnecting it via extender cables. 

With the module installed on extender cables, access is now 
available to all parts of the module, and the signal may be 
traced through the various stages, using an oscilloscope, 
millivoltmeter , or even high impedance headphones. Refer to the 
Block Schematic which shows the signal flow through the 
modules. When a point is reached where the signal is not 
present, or is distorted, the probable faulty components can be 
checked out and if necessary replaced. Integrated cicuits, due 
to their internal complexity, are the most likely cause of 
problems, followed by mechanical components such as switches and 
faders, which are susceptible to physical contamination from 
oxidisation, dust and liquids. 

5.02 Removing Modules 

Remove the 2 module retaining screws, which will allow the 
module to be carefully withdrawn from the console. The ribbon 
cable will now be exposed, and may be detached from the module. 
The module will still have some cables attached, but these are 
sufficiently long to allow the module to be completely withdrawn 
from the console. Extender cables can now be plugged into the 
main ribbon cable, and the module, taking care not to twist the 
extender cable. Modules should NOT be plugged in or unplugged 
with the power switched ON. 



Page30 



5.03 METER ALIGNMENT 



Each VU meter has its own individual drive card on the master RH 
PCB. 

OVU is normally adjusted to indicate a line level of +4dBu ie. a 
level of 1.228 volts. However, it can be re-adjusted to 
indicate a different line level, if required, by the pre-set 
potentiometer on the card. 

Connect a millivoltmeter to the group output. Route the 
oscillator to the group and adjust the group output level to 
read the required level on the millivoltmeter. (Normally this 
would be +4dBu). Adjust the VU drive pre-set to indicate OVU on 
the VU meter and repeat for all other groups. 

5.04 LAMP REPLACEMENT 



Illumination of the VU meters is provided by 1 lamp in each 
meter, these are 12 volt lamps. The lamps in each pair of 
meters are wired in series and powered by the ±\1 volt audio 
supply. A series resistor in each meter pair provides turn on 
current limiting to prolong the lamp life. 

To replace the lamp remove the VU meter from the panel. This is 
achieved by the following method: - 

1. Remove the group/master module from the console. 

2. Unscrew the four screws through the PCB and remove the 
connecting cable. 

3. The meter assembly can now be removed from the module. 

4. Remove the front from the meter(s) and replace the bulb. 

5. To replace the assembly reverse the above procedure. 



Page31 



5.05 Power Supply Servicing 



The Series 200B power supply provides the following regulated 
supply rails; 

i) +/- 17 volts. Audio 

ii) +48 volts. Phantom Power 

If a power supply fault is suspected, first ensure that it 
really is the P.S.U. which is at fault, and not a short circuit 
in the console. This can be checked by disconnecting the P.S.U. 
from the console, and measuring the voltage at the connector. A 
load across the supply should be provided, to simulate the 
normal load conditions imposed by the console. 

A 10 Ohm, 20 Watt resistor should be connected across each of 
the audio supply rails. The phantom power supply can be loaded 
with a 2.2kOhm, 1 Watt resistor. 

The ripple and noise value of the various supply rails can now 
be measured, using a millivoltmeter or an oscilloscope. 

If a fault is found to exist in the P.S.U., disconnect the mains 
supply and remove the cover. Check visually for any obvious 
problems, such as blown fuse, burnt components, etc. If nothing 
obvious is observed, reconnect the mains and measure the 
voltages across the various electrolytic smoothing capacitors, 
which should be as follows; 

Audio Supply Cl = +26volts 

C2 = -26volts 

Phantom Supply Cl 2 = +59volts 

Differences of jf1 0% are acceptable, due to variations in the 
incoming mains voltage. If satisfactory, the problem lies in 
the regulator section. If not, however, check the bridge 
rectifier, smoothing capacitor and transformer for failure. 



Page32 



6.00 GLOSSARY OF TERMS USED 



AFL 

Attenuate 
Auxiliary Send 
Bus 
Cold 

Cut 

dB (decibel) 
Ground 

Group Output 

Hot 

Hz 

Insert 

Khz 

kOhm 

Mains 

Multitrack Logic 



After fade Listen: This button will "solo" 

the signal (or ALL with their AFL buttons 
down) on the monitors, and the feed for this 
solo is taken AFTER the fader. 

To reduce the electrical level or amount of 
gain . 

Extra output from the console, usually used 
for echo sends and foldback. 

Wire carrying a signal or sum of a group of 
signals . 

The negative going current of a signal. With 
2 signal wires, one is positive going (hot), 
and the other is negative going. (cold) 

To cut a channel means to turn it OFF. 

A logarthmic ratio used to represent voltage 
or power gain. The reference about which the 
ratio is made is usually stated. 

Earth or screen of a cable when refering to 
connecting leads. 

The output of a group bus which is carrying a 
sum of all the signals assigned to that group 
number . 

Positive going current of a signal. With 2 
signal wires, one is positive going (hot), 
and the other is negative going. (cold) 

Measurement of frequency (Hertz) 1 Hz == 1 
cycle per second. 

An insert point allows peripheral equipment 
to be introduced into the signal path. 

Measurement of frequency expressed to the 
power of 1000. i.e. 1 Khz = 1 000 cycles per 
second . 

Measurement of electrical resistance 
expressed to the power of 1000. i.e. 1 kOhm = 
1000 Ohms . 

Local Electrical Supply. 

Either the multitrack machine's monitor 
switching or its safe/record switching. 

Page33 



Ohm Measurement of electrical resistance. 

Overdubbing The process of recording new tracks on a 

multitrack tape recorder whilst listening 
back in synchronisation with previously 
recorded tracks. 



Pan Pot 



PFL 



Phantom Power 



Post 



A pan pot places a signal across two stereo 
lines (left & right) turning it to the left 
will send all the signal to the left line, 
and when turned to the right, all the signal 
will be sent to the right side. If the pan 
pot is at its centre detent, an equal amount 
of signal will be fed to both sides and the 
image in the stereo picture will be central. 

Pre fade Listen: This button will "solo" the 
signal (or ALL with their PFL buttons down) 
on the monitors, and the feed for this solo 
is taken BEFORE the fader. 

A voltage (usually +48 Volts) across the 
microphone input to power capacitor 
microphones . 

Post means after the fader. 



Pre 



Pre means before the fader. 



Ring The connecting part in the middle of a stereo 

jack, (it mates second). 

Signal to Noise 

Ratio The ratio between the level of signal and the 

level of unwanted noise. 



Sleeve 



Star Point 



Sync Mode 



Tip 



The connecting part of a stereo jack which 
mates last and is always earth. 

A single point to which ALL earths are 
separately connected. 

Used whilst overdubbing; previously recorded 
tracks are played back through the record 
head whilst you record on other tracks. 

The connecting part at the end of a stereo 
jack, (it mates first). 



Track Bouncing Taking a group of previously recorded tracks 

and recording them as a group onto another 
track. e.g. bouncing down 4 vocals from 4 
tracks to just one track "frees" 3 tracks for 
fresh recording. 



Page34 




7.00 SERIES 200B TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION 



7.01 GENERAL 

1 . Configuration 
Inputs : 

Between 8 and 32 input channel modules. 

8 tape returns in the monitor/mix section. 

1 two- track tape return. 

Outputs : 

4 Groups . 

4 Auxiliaries. 

Mix L and R. 

Headphones. (Breaks CRM.) 

Control Room Monitor, (CRM). 

2. Level switching 

There is extensive level switching within the console, enabling 
it to be used with both +4dBu and -lOdBV, (Tascam level), 
external equipment. The level switching is done on a per-PCB 
basis allowing both level standards to be used. 

3. Operating levels 
Inputs : 

Line In: +4dBu or -lOdBV. 

Mic Inr^' 

Group outputs/Tape returns: 

+4dBu or -lOdBV. 

Aux outputs: 

+4dBu. Not switchable; adjust level on Aux master pot. 

Mix outputs: 

+4dBu or -lOdBV. 

2-track return: 

+4dBu or -lOdBV, 

Internal : 

-6dBu nominal. 



Ground compensated. (See MI2426) 
Ground compensated. (See MI2426) 
Electronically balanced. 

Electronically balanced. 



Page35 



7,02 INPUT CHANNEL 



The circuitry of the channel is fairly standard, and only the 
points of interest are noted - 

A jumper provides the gain switching for the line input. 

Pushing the jumper ON introduces extra attenuation, and provides 
suitable sensitivity for +4dBu operation. This is located above 
Conn 1 and to the left of RIC 1 . 

The PFL switch, (S4), signals a PFL condition to the Solo Enable 
bus by connecting it to V- through a 100k. resistor, (R25). The 
Solo Enable bus operates as a virtual-earth bus so that there 
are no transient signals on it that might crosstalk onto the 
audio buses. 

Extensive changes in the sourcing of the 4 Aux sends are 
possible by moving the pre/post jumpers located towards the 
centre of the PCB, these allow various combinations of pre/post 
EQ and pre/post fader sends. The Auxes are arranged in two 
pairs . 

Pre Post Pre Post 
Aux 1&2 

Aux 3&4 

EQ FADER 

(Refer to Input module Circuit diagram ED2183 and Input module 
Signal flow diagram ED2227.) 

Routing is through 22k resistors, the outward end being grounded 
when routing switching is released, so that crosstalk cannot 
occur to the bus across the switch contact capacitance. 

7.03 GROUP OUTPUT 



The Series 200B Group Output summing circuit is a conventional 
virtual-earth amp whose output feeds the fader. At this point 
the signal is out of phase. The fader amp is configured for 
1 OdB of gain, and restores the signal to its -6dBu nominal level 
and correct phase. The output amp is a ground compensated type. 
This has output level swtiching in its feedback loops. 

Switch, S5, OUT for +4dBu. 

Switch, S5, IN for -lOdBV, 

TAPE RETURNS 

Two returns are provided per group. For Group 1 , the returns 
are 1 and 5, for Group 2, they are 2 and 6, etc. Each return is 
balanced with an input impedance of >10k. There is level 
switching in the feedback loop, and the switch contacts are 
combined with those of the Group Output so that by operating one 
switch, all levels on a Group PCB are changed. 



Page36 



The output of return amp 1 goes to the normally open side of the 
RET switch, (S2). The meter and PEL feeds are taken from the 
wiper of S2 . When pressed, the signal accesses VR1 , (Aux 1), 

and VR2, (Vol). The output of IC goes to the SUB switch, 

(S4), which normally routes it to the Pan pot, (VR3), and then 
the Mix bus. 

If the SUB switch is pressed, IC 's output goes via a mix 
resistor to the group bus, and the Group Output is fed into the 

Panpot- With SUB and RET out, the Group Output feeds the meter, 

VR1 , VR2 and the Panpot via IC and SUB: the tape return goes 
no-where . 

Return 5 is somewhat simpler in operation: the balanced input 

goes to the gain-switched return amp and then into AUX1 , (VR4), 
VOL, (VR5), and PEL. The VOL amp's output is applied to the 
Panpot and the Mix buses. 

7.04 MASTER LH PCB (Auxiliary Masters) 



The are 4 Aux masters, each of which have a master level pot and 
an AEL switch. They reside on the Master LH PCB. The circuitry 
is conventional and consists of a virtual-earth summing amp 
followed by a level pot and ground compensated output amp. 

7.05 MASTER RH PCB 

This PCB holds the Mix L and R paths, 2-track returns, headphone 
monitors, PEL/AEL system, oscillator and talkback circuitry. 

MIX PATH 

The Mix summing amp is followed by an inverting insert-send 
driver which corrects the signal phase. The insert return feeds 
the fader and its amp, (+10dB gain). The level switching stage 
drives the EBOS amp, the output of which goes to the Mix XLR and 
the 2-track return switch. 

2 -TRACK RETURN 

This is a balanced line input with level switching. Its output 
is switched by an EET into the headphone monitor circuit. 

PEL/AEL SYSTEM 

The PEL/AEL signal is summed, passes through an inverting stage 
and then goes to the switching EETs. 

When a PEL or AEL switch is pressed the PEL/AEL enable bus is 
connected to V- by a 100k resistor. IC9 is connected as a 
virtual earth stage and so acts to maintain zero volts on the 
bus by moving its output positively. When the op-amp output 
goes positive, TR5 is turned on by R70 and the not-PEL logic 
signal goes low. TR6 is turned off by R42 and the PEL logic 
circuit goes high. These changes turn off TR7 via D1 and allow 
R21 to keep TR8 held on. Therefore, the signal from IC23 is 
ignored, and that from the PEL/AEL summing amp, ICS, is passed 
to the monitoring system instead. R22 helps absorb EET 



Page37 



switching transients. 



HEADPHONE MONITORING 

The FET outputs go to the meter switch, talkback switches, 

(which kill the phones when operated), and the Monitor Volume 
pot. The tip-normal and ring-normal contacts of the phones 
socket feed the Control Room monitor EBOS amps. 

OSCILLATOR AND TALKBACK 

The talkback, (TB), and slate oscillator, (OSC), share the same 
set of mix resistors, and therefore only one can be used at a 
time. TB always overrides OSC. When neither are enabled S3D, 
S5B, and S4C ground the mix resistors to prevent interbus 
crosstalk. C48 is not grounded by S3D or S4D and the TB mic amp 
gain is reduced to unity. 

The oscillator is enabled by S5A and switches S3C, S5B and S3D 
take the output signal to ground when it is not slated. When 
OSC is pressed the ground is removed from both the osc output 
and the mix resistors, which slates the oscillator. 

For Talkback to be enabled, either TB ALL or TB 1-2 are used. 

TB 1-2 selects the first 2 Auxes, TB ALL applies TB to the 4 
group buses, Auxes 1 and 2 and the mix buses. 

Operating TB switch removes the ground on the mix resistors and 
applies a ground to C48 to allow the full mic gain set by VR2 to 
be realised. R84 sets the maximum gain and R82, C45 provide 
smooth power to the electret microphone. 

METER DRIVE 

This is an active gain, single op-amp driver. 



Page38 



8.00 SQUNDCRAFT RECOMMENDED WARRANTY 



(This warranty applies to sales within the UK and should form 
the basis of the warranty offered by the overseas vendor of 
Soundcraft products.) 



1 . ' Soundcraft ' 

'End User' 

' Dealer ' 



' Equipment ' 



means Soundcraft Electronics Ltd. 

means the person who first puts the equipment 

into regular operation. 

means the person other than Soundcraft (if 
any) from whom the End User purchased the 
Equipment, provided such a person is 
authorised for this purpose by Soundcraft or 
its accredited Distributor. 

means the equipment supplied with this manual. 



2. If within the period of twelve months from the date of 

delivery of the Equipment to the End User it shall prove 
defective by reason only of faulty materials and/or 
worl<.manship (but not faulty design) to such an extent that 
the effectiveness and/or usability thereof is materially 
affected the Equipment or the defective component should be 
returned to the Dealer or to Soundcraft and subject to the 
following conditions the Dealer or Soundcraft will repair or 
at its option replace the defective components. Any 
components replaced will become the property of Soundcraft. 



3. Any Equipment or component returned will be at the risk of 
the End User whilst in transit (both to and from the Dealer 
or Soundcraft) and postage must be prepaid. 



4. This warranty shall only be available if:- 

a) the Equipment has been properly installed in accordance 
with instructions contained in Soundcraft' s manual; and 

b) the End User has notified Soundcraft or the Dealer 
within 14 days of the defect appearing; and 

c) no persons other than authorised representatives of 
Soundcraft or the Dealer have effected any replacement 
of parts maintenance adjustments or repairs to the 
Equipment; and 

d) the End User has used the Equipment only for such 
purposes as Soundcraft recommends, with only such 
operating supplies as meet Soundcraft' s specifications 
and otherwise in all respects in accordance with 
Soundcraft 's recommendations. 



Page39 



5 . 



Defects arising as a result of the following are not covered 
by this Warranty: faulty or negligent handling, chemical or 
electro-chemical or electrical influences, accidental 
damage. Acts of God, neglect, deficiency in electrical 
power, air-conditioning or humidity control. 

6. The benefit of this Warranty may not be assigned by the End 
User . 

7. End Users who are consumers should note their rights under 
this Warranty are in addition to and do not affect any other 
rights which they may be entitled against the seller of the 
Equipment . 



Page 40 



9.00 SERIES 200B CUSTOMER SPARES KIT LIST 



RZ2259 



COMPONENT 
ITEM NO, 


DESCRIPTION 


QTY 


BA0001 


DIODE IN4148 


5 


BB01 06 


ZENER DIODE 400mW 11V 


1 


BC0302 


BDG RECT KBF02 200V 2 . 5A 


1 


BD0301 


PNP TRANS 2SA842GR/2SA970GR 


1 


BD0302 


NPN TRANS 2SC1 681BL/2SC2240BL 


5 


BD0 31 7 


NPN TRANS BD135 


1 


BD0322 


FET SWITCH J112 


2 


BD0329 


PNP TRANS 2N4403 


5 


BE0403 


QUAD OP AMP IC TL074 


2 


BE0404 


SGL OP ICTL071 


2 


BE041 3 


DUAL OP AMP IC TL072 


5 


BE041 8 


V.REG LM337K-1 .2/37V 1 . 5A (T03) 


1 


BE041 9 


V.REG LM31 7K+1 .2/37V 1 . 5A (T03) 


1 


BE0428 


DUAL OP AMP IC NE5532 


5 


JA0001 


TOSHIBA MINI LED GREEN TLG1 02 


3 


JA0002 


TOSHIBA MINI LED RED TLR1 02 


3 


JA0003 


TOSHIBA LED RED TLR1 04 


1 


NA01 30 


M3x8mm PAN POZI BLCK SCRW 


1 0 


NC0231 


M3 BLACK NYLON WASHER 


1 0 


RV1 297 


S200B EXTENDER WFM ASSY. 


1 


ZD0301 


1.6A ANTI-SURGE FUSE 20mm 


3 


ZD0307 


6.3A 20mm FUSE 


3 



DRAWINGS FOR S200B MANUAL 



iss 3 



ED21 83 
ED2251 
ED21 79 
ED2255 
ED21 1 6 

ED2227 

ED2224 

ED2262 

MI2420 

MI2422 

MI2423 

MI2475 

MI2476 

MI2426 



I/P MODULE PCB CCT DIAGRAM 
RH MASTER PCB CCT DIAGRAM 
0/P PCB CCT DIAGRAM 
LH MASTER PCB CCT DIAGRAM 
S400B PSU CCT DIAGRAM 

INPUT MODULE SIGNAL FLOW DIAGRAM 
MASTER MODULE SIGNAL FLOW DIAGRAM 
S200B BLOCK DIAGRAM 

STD 0/P REAR CONN LINE DRAWING 
STD I/P REAR CONN LINE DRAWING 
RACK MOUNT REAR CONN LINE DRAWING 

S200B CONSOLE CONFIGURATION 

S200B RACKMOUNT CONSOLE CONFIGURATION 

GROUND COMPENSATION DIAGRAM 




OUTPUT 
REAR CONNS 



12 / 2/88 

ISSUE 1 
6-4-88 
DIMNS FOR 
LENGTHS CHND 

ISSUE 2 

END PROFILE 
SHAPE CHANGED 

27- S- 88 




INPUT MODULES 

OPTIONS - STANDARD I/P 
STEREO I/P 
SWEEP EQ I/P 



OUTPUT 




NOTE 

SCREW HEADS PROTRUDE 3mm 
BEYOND PROFILE EACH END. 
MAX.DIMNS. INCLUDE SCREW DIMN. 



S200B MAX FRAME SIZES (LENGTH A') 

& 8 CH= 17-570;; 

S200BVE 16 CH= 27-570 

24 CH= 37-570" 



32 CH = 47-570 



TOLERANCES 

HOLE SIZES AFTER PAINHNC 


GENERAL TOLERANCE 


&-3mm = 


-f 0 10 
- 0 00 


Ottola wh«f« not appllcoblo. 


OVER 3-€mm 
OVER 6-10mm * 

OVER = 


-f 0 12 
- 0 00 

-f 0 15 
- 0 00 
•f 0 18 
- 0 00 


± 0 50 mm (0 02<n 
1 0 25 mm (0 010^ 

±0 12 mm (0 0051 
HOLE CENTRES ± 0 004“ 


OVER 18-25mm = 


-f 021 
- 0 00 


ALL ANGLES ± 0 SO* 


OVER 25mm ® 


0 25 
- 0 00 


Unless ottierwise stated. 



ORN 

MJH 




THIRD ANGLE PROJECTION 

THIS DRAWING TO COMPLY 
TO BS308. 



SOUNDCRAFT ELECTRONICS LTD 
UNIT 2, 

BOREHAMWOOD INDUSTRIAL PARK, 
ROWLEY LANE, 

BOREHAMWOOD, 

HERTFORDSHIRE WD6 5PZ. 
TELEPHONE: 01-207-5050 
FACSIMILE No. 2070194 



S200B & 200BVE 
OVERALL DIMENSIONS 
& OPTIONS 



DRG. No. MI 2684 
























LINE 

INPUT 

SKTn 



T_ 

TN 



\ — • 

i A y RN ' 




i E__ 





S 






THIHO ANGLE PROJECTION 


TOLGRANCe 


MOLE INDEX 




1 


1 

-(==y] 




Ail imperial dimensiorn O'OlO 
All metric dimensiorvs 0'25mm 






*0= 






AM angles ♦ 0'50 





Unlvts ot^>«rwive stated 



G 



I 



7 



M 

ISSUE p] 

- 6-85 
I SSUG 1 



3 -7-85 



ISSUE 2 
CONI PINS 
TRANSPOSED 
COMPONPONEIT' 



PRE-FIXES 

ADDED 

470R VALUES 
WERE 150 



2 



MJH 2 / 2 / 89 



3 



6K8 

Rn 




4K7 

Rn 



470R 

Rn 



5 



470R 



Rn 



6 



MIC 

INPUT 



<»«> 



LINE 

INPUT 



CN1 



96 76 
10 8 



o o 




CONNECTOR VEIWED FROM 
SOLDER SIDE OF REAR CONN 
PCB 



7 



MATE 


ORN 

CHRIS 


SOUNOCRAPT ELECTRONICS LTO 
5-8 GREAT SUTTON STREET 


TITLE 


FINISH 


trco 


LONDON eClV oox. 








TELEPHONE. 01-2G1-3G31/2/3 




SCALE 


CHKO 


TELEGRAMS. SOUNOCRAPT LON EC1 
TELEX. UK. No. 21 190. USA. No. 22AA00 


DRG. No. 



S 200 B 
INPUTRCP 
CCTDIA 



ED 2301 



UOO 30010 

































I STANDARD INPUT 

ItPUT R£AR CONN 




oncx/p 6lAn MIX BOS 

1 ? I t I Q 



«X)IWG Wlf(M 




mPl/r RCAR CONN 



UVK)I« L^MOKJ 

UP A/IP \ *^ 



intw h--H 



AU PATHS IN STtPfO UCCSS OTKRWISC SK3WN 



loPivt 



OBouP ecrtLS MU 6 tfS 

J i ) k I a 




N6: AUX 0/P« MOMO 



GROUP DUS 1 



CflcxNo (omp <yp 



TAPC RETURN 1 



lAPE RETURN 5 



SlPtilf<2 l«SIPT 
■ AMP I 



I TO PfL eus 
PfL 



f STANWRD OUTPUT 

OUTPUT REAR CONN 



i rj WL Bj/S 
PFl 




A AAJX hjiSItBS OC 0 <T X>A< 



MASTER LH 




OUTPUT REAP ODfCV 



ourr>ur reat^ conn 




mS7[P RM 



{60S hix O/P 



AU '»i>n is siiuim<«(n m o',f ah.o imi <».| r «^< 






Li 2J» 



P«xs AC< 

WCXfT 



pui*a HI 

WlO k WftCMlsC 

sraci 







CONTROL ROOM MONITORS 



»y* C/O/P MCX 

fKTi\ f\yrjk% «U^ 



nwaj *<HrxX h<Xji.C 10< j iaati_ 



AJI •rsjWs 1 O 



C^«C. SCX^CJKAJT TLfCflO^CS ITU 

AO 

i -0 CJtt'.AT UmOK SIHfCT 



TK3). UOOOH. CC IV Ou. TilOfK OlA&TiAM 

Tfiri-'IX. 

o#ca Tux/><A*<r; s<x»ooukrT u>c cc« 

'flCX ?,KX,.1,C^^O,.JJ03 WOM, (0J?6? 



issue 1 
30-<. -05 



HI-PASS FILTER 



I 



INSERT 



LINE I/P 0 
/'—X (LH 1/P ONL 



INPUT GAIN 



, MONO SUM 
R SWITCHING 



EQUALISER 



ALL PATHS IN STEREO. UNLESS OTHERWISE SHOWN- 



I NORMALLY CLOSED CONTACT 



A NORMALLY OPEN CONTACT 



V / PUSH ON LINK 




CHANNEL 

FADER 



BALANCE 



TO PFL BUS 



FADER 
PRE POST 



ROUTING 

MATRIX 





GROUP 

BUSES 




AUX 1 



AUX 2 



AUX 3 



AUX A 



I 



NB: AUX SENDS IN MONO 



THino ANGLE PROJECTION I TOLGRANCG 




AJI Imp**’!*! ^O'OIO 

All metric ♦ O' 2t>mm 

All •ogi««^0'60* 




SOUNOCRAET CLGCTRONICS LTO 
S-8 GREAT SUTTON STREET 
LONDON EC1V OUX. 

TELEPHONE. 01-2S1<W>3 1/2/3 
TELEGRAMS, SOUNOCRAFT LON CCl 
TELEX.uk. No, 21198, USA. No, 224408 



T'Ti-e SERIES 2000 

STEREO I/P MODULE 
SIGNAL FLOW DIAGRAM 



ona. No. ED 2 259 



« t O 































imi 


Issue 1 

9 - L - 85 




Issue 2 
13-5-85 




Issue 3 
3-7-85 




Issue U 
31 7 85 






ISSUE 6 
6-9-89 



Soundcraft Etactronics Linwted 
o«m the copyright of this drawing 
«vhtch is not to ba co pied, reprodocod 
or disctosed. in part or whole, to a 
third party without written permission. 



ALL CONNEaORS VIEWED FROM COMPONENT SIDE OF 
PCB 




TMtRO ANGUE PfiOJ6CTK>N I 



AM imperial dime n sioos -0*010 
An metric dimen s ions -0*25mm 
All angtm io SO° 

Unless otherwise stated. 




ORG. 

CHRIS 




SOONOOUFT ELECTRONICS LTD. 
5-» CREAT SLTTTDN S I HtE T 
UXOOH. EC IV. oex. 

TELEPMONE. 01-251-3«31/2/3 
T'ELEGRAMS. SOUNOCRATT LON. EC1 
telex, ok No. 21198. USA No 01-2203 



TITLE. S200B 

LHMASTERttT 
DIAGRAM 
(SC 1539) 



DNG No. EO 2?S5 



























ORG Mo. EO 2251 



O C2,y'‘ 

loonor, •• R 2 

'nCIA 

a” 

T 

2u2/50 



?2^K 
ICA ,,toop 



■'Ir- 
es reiT 

1.7/25 L I 



INS I 
SNQi 
L U_ 




LEFT FADER 

r 1 ii 



8 PIN SIL n.r, 
AxlOK 

RICl C6 JJP. 

8 PINSILHI— i 1 

AxAK7 I_!_r-C4 RIO 



R7 riRS 
' 22KV 1K6 



TV^ < ICAA 
INE5S32/2 



L||5F: 

cr' 

CTOiiH'* 



2u2/50 

^C12 

T 

>11 eia 

A7/2S 



T^^M 5532 Q 



CiH^¥p 



C 16 .. iiP 

'•rn^ 



C17 tR7 
1.7/25 



iTK INA1L8 
R20 D1 



►SW1B 15K 

' R15 p 

' ElE] Jl. ] 

R16|] 

iokV 



> ^072 47/25 ER8 



ll?Df?'M/50, ‘PIN8 



12 - A - 85 
luue 2 

13 - 5 - as 

Issue 3 
3-7-85 
ISSUE A 
R1.1A.1S. 26,33. 
RA6.A7 &58 
WERE 22K. 
R85-9A WERE 
A7K. 

R95, 97,99 8101 
WERE 27K 
19-3-87 
Issue 5 

Conn. 3. Pin No's 
1 88 Transposed. . 
29-5-87 



■ 

I 






R3S 

12K 

E^';, loop 

'^^' ^072 

2 

IC2B 



RIGHT FADER 




JACK ON REAR 
CONNECTION PANEL 
TR37 
J22K 



AR76 
CA3 UieK 

lOOnplJr''^ 
TL072 S 

n IClo\H I 

V OSC ' 

^LFVEL 



. CAA 1 

• A7/2S 1 

VR2 , 

n lOK LOG 



1R82 

Ja7K 71 
I CA6 



lioop 



RICA 

8 PIN SIL 
AxlOK 



WR3 

IlOK R.LOG 
R6A 

100/10 

Ci.8 



RIC3 E28 
8 PIN SIL Hi 
AxAK7 — 



2x12/50 



10x33K 
R87 

I§IZZIZI 

R89 

R90 

R91 

R92 

R93 

R9A 



CHASSIS PI 
GND y 

• VA 7 R'03^ 

CST?; 

A7/25 T 

OVA 

47/25 T RWA 

- VA 1 1— cn— 

10 

•VGy R 105 

css-i. — 

U/JS T ^ 
OVH -FC56 ,i 

A7/25T 
-vH i: 



Ov V- V-AI 



RA2 C33 
75 A7/25 



'^NOpIi^ 



C29*’ ; 

C 30 iiHP I 



C 31 ^I> 3 P 



2 1C5b’^ A7/25 



GA G3 G2 Gl/x/I^PFL 
BUS CONNECTOR 
CON 1 

TOEDGEOFPCB 

i 



"1C8A K8B 




6808^4 



_ 10K 

C36 I I 33P 
RSV 1 



E37 IR9 
A7/25 



* 15K 

— J RAT J 
SWIO J6'] 

U TRACKI Q 
RA8] 
lOK 



JrA 9 C 35 
|27K 



10KL0G 
__,VR1B C39 




CA9 R95 VR6 R96 

2u2/50 A7K 22K 100K 



TAPE RE r R 



Tape ret l 



-10 — □- 



2.U2/50 47K 

— Pj (Z3- 

SW2A 



■ SW2B 
C52 

2>u2/50 

A7K 



JE 12 B 
^IL0 7a 



VR 8 RICO 
22 K 

"^ICIK] 

L&Jf^TL 07 Al 



IC120 

lijj'LOTi 



METER 
CONNECTO 
CON 3 
©o- V 



interface 

connector 



TOEDGEOFPCB 2 I A 3 

^ ? ? ? ? 



INS INS 1 16 RET INS 
SNOR SNOL R RETL 



CONTROL RMGNO i 
CONIR OI RM J .E 1 
CON flif K RM R IGHT 



HEAD PHONE 
JACK 



riR83 

I Ua70 

1R62 I 1 

Ja7 R3iIR6A 



^CAO IRJ 

j 100/10 n 

Tati 



Iss.6 

R12,R13RAARAS 
WERE IKS 
VRA,VR5 WERE 
2K2 

17-05-89 



COMPONENT 


TYPE 


PART N° 


IC 11,9 


TL071 


BEOAOA 


1C 2.6.78. 
10, 


IL072 


BE0A13 


1C 12 


TL07A 


BE0AO3 


IC1.3.A5, 


NF 5532 


BE0A26 



TR2.TRA. _SA970 GRIBD 0301 
TR 1,3.56, 2SC22AOBL BO 0302 

TR 76.9,10 J112 FET BO0322 

01-11 INA1A8 BAOOOl 

LEDl TLRIOA JA000 3 






Soun 4 cra(t G^^trooics Limited 
Own ft^ COpyr«9nt oi tt>is drawing 
wt>*ch is not to b« copied, reproduced 
or disck>sed. part or wt>oie. to a 
third party wrtNoot written permission. 



NOTES Ai 1. CONNEC TORS VIEWED EROM C0/Mt> S lOE OE PC B 

ALL JUMPERS SMOv/NEOR - A dBu Ot'ERATlNC, 

LEVEL 

-o o— JUMPER I.nSERTEO 

JUMPER NOT inserted 

EOR KJrfBV OT'ERatinG level reverse all JUMPER' 



Tt«RO ANGLE PWOJGCTON MAIL 



At( imperial d»menS«Ons -O-OtO 
Ail metric dimensOTVS -0-2Smm 
All angles - O 50° 

Unless otherwise stated 



SOUNOCnATT ELECT RONtCS LTO. 
S -8 GREAT SUTTON STREET 
LONDON EC tv. OflX. 

TELEPHONE. 01 - ?5t - 363»/2/3 
TELECnAfceS SOUNOCPAET LON EC1 
TEIEX UK Mo 2tl90. USA No 01*2203 



TtTLE. S?00B 

MASrCR R/HCIRCUII 
01 /-ORAM 
(SC iSfeO) 



cxi ^ fO 





R« 

22K . C26 




12K ♦ „ |C29 47/25 

C28 100 m 



AUX2 

VR9 I 

lOKLCXj ^OALPSFCR 



1R49 Cwt 
7K5 



I R53J3K9 CWl 

AUX3 AUX4 fl t M 3^ 

VRW VR11 U I |-aVR12^ I M"'' 

IIOKLOG rhWKLOG h \/n 

ft El 

\]T^S Nv^kI 



Supply to 
op -amps 



R61 27 

laus 



AUDIO UNO 
pCON3 



-17 .17 A1 A2 A3 A4 



2u2/5QR43 cjn 



TRA I lEDI 
RED 




ISSUE A 
C5-6B0pF 
C11(33pF)NOW 
j H CONtECTED 
26-7-09 



C 31 = A7/2Sp 



Soundcraft Elactronics Limited 
own the copyright of this drawing 
which is not to be copied, reproduced 
or disclosed, in part or whole, to a 
third party without written permission. 



IC 1,2,3,A = TL072 
ICS .TL071 
TR 1,2 = 2NAA03 

TR3,A = 2SC22A0BL 

LED 2 GREEN 
LED 1 RED 



-Chassis Ov -17 tl7 
CONN 2 BUS CONN 
TDEDGEOFPCB | 




TOLERANCES 

MOLE St2ES AFTEW PAtWTIWG 
0-3fntn ■ -O.TO 
OVER3>emm 
OVERO-IOmm ■ tj 
OVER 10-18mm ■ l§-oO 
OVER18-25mm ■ -qoO 
OVER 25 mm •To-oO 



GENERAL TOLERANCES 


MATL 


^9 


D*tete not •pptcsbl*. 

t 0 50mm (0-020 ) 


FINISH 


TRCD 


1 0-2Smm (0 010") 
0-12 mm (0005") 


SCALE 


CHKD 


AH angles t 0-50* 

Hole centres i0004~ 




"N THIRD ANGLE PROJECTION 

'Et f THIS DftAWING TO COMPLY 
TO BS308. 



SOUNDCRAFT ELECTRONICS LTD 
UNIT 2. 

BOREHAMWOOD INDUSTRIAL PARK. 
ROWLEY LANE, 

BOREHAMWOOD. 

HERTFORDSHIRE WD6 5PZ. 
TELEPHONE: 01- 207- 5050 
FACSIMILE No. 2070194 



S200B 
SWEEP EQ I/P 
CCT 



ORG Mo. ED 2531 
































TITLE 



I SOUNOCRAFT ELECTnONICS LTD 
1 5-« GREAT SLTTTON STREET 
I LONDON EClV OQX. 
i;>TELEP»K>NE. 01^10*31/2/3 
TELEGRAMS. SOUNOCRAFT LON EC1 



200B 

INPUT MODULE 
SIGNAL FLOW DIAGRAM 



TELEX.UK. No. 21 1»a. USA. No. 22-M08 



ORa.No. ED 2227 





































woo JOOlO 






























Soundcraft ElMtroniCS Limited 
own the copyright of this drawing 
which is not to be copied, reproduced 
or disclosed, in part or whole, to a 
third party without written permissioa 



ALL CONNECTORS VIEWED FROM COMPONENT SIDE OF ”«-E INDEX 
PCB 

AM resistors in ohms 
Capacitors m micro farads 
Unless otherwise stated 
































ORG Miv E0 2179 



R21 R22 

?0K 2K2! 



lOKrS kw lOKfS lew 

LOG < 1 LOG < 

AOXlUvRL VOlUvRS 



TOPCB EDGE 



VIEWED FROM 

WTSIQE 



1 lOKfLtcw 
Riofi r — 

?2K AUX lUvRI 



10K LOG , 

FaOER R 3S 



CIS 

?2Pf 




lOKATtw 

LOG < 



iV ^ rL07? C5 

C7/25 



”1>^TL07t 






R39 o' -13 

-r~3 — I—, 



(.v> 

— ci- 



T“St? I PUSH 

Rt2 COR 

* — — o' -10 
7KS SS 




7(25 ^ 

o«<.L 



ISSUE 2 
HOODED 
1S-1W 

®iel 

CONN HOODED AM 
RES UNCHANGED 
9 - S - 8S 
Issue A 

3-7-65 

Issue 5 
22 - 6-86 
Issue 6 

r ^ R37 & RAO were 
6K8 OCR 17A6 
21 -2 -67 
ISSUE 7 
CB REVERSED 
23-2-87 

ISSUE 8 

CHANGED VALUE 
R3A 220k was 22k 
C19 2206J wos 
A7/25 

DG. ADDED RA8 22K 
25-A-69 






COMPONENT 


TYPE 


PART NO. 


ICl 


NE5532 


BE0A28 


IC2, 1C 3 


a072 


BE0A13 


ICA 


a071 


DEOAOA 



I 



■ 



CHASSIS GNU 
PlH 

o -O 



O o o o o 

A1 A2 A3 AC. L. 

iJUlj' 



Soundcr«<t El*ctn)nic« UmM«d 
owm o o pyrt g M o4 tM« dr^4ng 

«»MoH ftcH to b* oopUd. ropfOducod 

of dlicicjoid, k% part or «4«ota, to a 



Ail CONNECTORS VIEWED FROM COMPONENT SIDE OF 
PCB 



All Imparial dwwamtooa -0-010 
All metric t f t m mnaiont l0*2S«T«n 
All ar>gt aa tO Vf 
Unieaa oCf*erw> is e stated. 




BUS connector 

CONN 1 

i 

TO EDGE OE PCS 



SOUkOCHAfT ELBCmONKS LID. 
5-a GREAT SL/TTON STROET 
LONDON. ECJV. Oex. 

TELEPHONC 01-Z5t- 3031/2/3 
TELBOWAAtS. SOUNOCRAET LON. EC1 
TELEX. OK No. 21108. USA No. 01-2203 



S2008 

STANDARD OUTPUT 
CIRCUIT. ( SC1AA6 ) 



DNQ Ho. E02179 
















A 



0 



C 



D 



E 
























SooocJcr^it etectronics Limited 
Own the copyright ot this drawing 
which is not to be copied, reproduced 
or disclosed, ir’ p3rt Or wtv>te, to a 
third party withoot written permrssioo. 



All resistors in ohms. 

All capacitors in micro forads 
Unless otherwise stated 



POWER SUPPLY 
PCS 



Uo*ese other wi s e seated. 



TtLCCAAMS. SOUNOCRAfT LON. 6C1 



rtLex. UK Ho 21198. USA No. 01-2203 D«G Ho. E0;il6